ACEC

The American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) is the voice of America's engineering industry. Council members – numbering more than 5,000 firms representing more than 500,000 employees throughout the country – are engaged in a wide range of engineering works that propel the nation's economy, and enhance and safeguard America's quality of life. These works allow Americans to drink clean water, enjoy a healthy life, take advantage of new technologies, and travel safely and efficiently. The Council's mission is to contribute to America's prosperity and welfare by advancing the business interests of member firms

Virtual Curriculum: A program design solution for A/E/C firms.

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The responses were interesting and varied when last month I submit this series of questions to more than a dozen online professional discussion groups.

“Does anyone have an example of a virtual curriculum based upon an individual’s subject matter interest rather than group subjects or topics? Is success measured based upon the participant’s mastery of the subject or some type of norm scores? Are the results tied to work performance, pay, or certification?

Quickly, a definition of “virtual” needed to be established. It was generally agreed in most of the discussion groups that “virtual” meant “online.” Bill Brunk, Ph.D asked the question on the CLO Magazine discussion group, “ I wonder if you might not be confusing two concept here: self-directed learning and virtual (online) learning.” Dr. Brunk brought up a good point and I thought we were beginning to address the question but the largest number of immediate responses came from consultants and schools who obviously were trying to market their online courses. If they bothered to look, I too offer online classes on my website– but that did not really address the questions.

To clarify I stated that I wanted to explore the curriculum definition that relates to a set of courses constituting an area of specialization, where curriculum is built around the individual’s interest rather than the institutions offerings. I was looking for more than simply saying we (the association/consultant/university) give online degrees or provide certification in...(fill in the blank).

From the TED discussion group Donald R. (Chip) Levy, a former Senior Director of Professional Development at the AIA responded with, “In common practice, many think of a curriculum as a generally linear, organized learning path to some goal (degree, certification, specialist credential, etc.). For me, the interesting twist has less to do with getting one's ticket punched at the end of a process, and more to do with building a thoughtful, if idiosyncratic, learning program that continually moves each learner toward evolving performance excellence and (career) success. The resources can be from a variety of sources, focused on a variety of KSAs, employing a variety of delivery channels and media, and uniquely aggregated for each person. It is an ongoing, evolutionary prospect -- a "lifelong curriculum" that guides "lifelong learning" as we progress through our careers.”

In conclusion, I believe that technology allows us to expand our learning options in a format where we can pick the one that works best for us. If I take courses at my own discretion I would be reluctant to call that a curriculum. In order for the learning to become a curriculum I would suggest that the process follows a guided path, such as one outlined by a negotiated contract. I would advocate however that the curriculum options are greatly expanded when the learning process is not limited or restricted to just the courses offered by the school, the association or a business. The instructor or consultant thus becomes a learning adviser - guiding the learner toward agreed upon learning goals.

Use of the International Learning Unit (ILU) at WVA

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The International Learning Unit (ILU) is an excellent standard to use as a measurement for learning. It has proven to be extremely well suited for online education. While at the American Institute of Architects we used the ILU as the baseline of measurement of learning for the online education that we offered. We found that it was more useful, flexible, accurate, and defendable when we wanted our continuing education credits to apply for mandatory continuing education credits for the architect’s licenses.

Sherry Kuehn, is the Senior Program Coordinator at West Virginia University (WVU). Sherry works in the office of Continuing and Professional Education (C&PE), a Division of WVU Extended Learning. Sherry shared with me that WVU adopted the ILU into their Forensics Program in 2008. She stresses that it works particularly well for that program as forensic professionals do not have a standard, mandated requirement to take continuing education classes in order to continue working in their field – no matter the specialization. Sherry stated that the entire WVU forensic program is completely online which to date includes 25 courses. These courses utilize a pre- and post-test as well as discussion boards, quizzes, and interactive projects to assist students in learning the material. Sherry stated that the instructors of the forensic courses assign the ILU value based on the criteria set forth by the Learning Resource Network (LERN) which is 50 content items = 1.0 ILU. Every activity within each course is set at an 80% mastery level before the student can proceed to the next unit or module. In the past year, the American Board of Criminalistics (ABC) has approved this training and the use of the ILU for mastery of content. Sherry added that while the ABC won’t print its endorsement on any publications at this time, this is not necessarily specific to just ILUs.

The International Learning Unit (ILU) holds new relevancy in the age of the Internet

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As almost everyone who works in the field of continuing education, professional development or organizational development knows - the continuing education unit (CEU) was the model for measurement most frequently used during the 20th century. This time based model worked well in the industrial age. Unfortunately the CEU model hasn’t changed, nor has it kept up to date while our global cultures have changed. So what can improve, update or replace the CEU? The International Learning Unit (ILU) developed in the 21st century to address the changing needs of continuing and professional education in the age of the Internet.

According to Wikipedia the “International Learning Unit (ILU)” is an outcome based measurement of learning designed for lifelong learning activities. The ILU is a competency based approach to measuring learning education courses. The ILU is an alternative measurement and standard to the time based measured courses. The ILU measurement can be used to provide evidence of completion of continuing education requirements mandated by certification bodies, professional societies, or governmental licensing boards.

The ILU was designed for the needs of the 21st century. Instead of recording seat time in class the ILU measures the knowledge and skills of the participants. The ILU adopts well to web based education that has begun to warp, change, and reshape time as it relates to learning. Unfortunately all of the rules and laws are currently written measuring the professionals success in time spent at the event. Does this still make sense in your continuing education or certification program to measure seat time – when there might not even be a seat used? Isn’t it time to adapt the International Learning Unit?

Evaluation and Improvement – The 7th key to quality continuing education for product manufacturers

For the product manufacturer the 7th key towards providing quality continuing education is to evaluate each course upon completion and use the results to continually improve the course. Michael D. Perry, Hon. AIA,is the Vice President Government Sales and STAMP and is currently with Simon Roofing/SR Products. Michael has been a long time advocate of holding the product manufacturer accountable to the highest standards of developing and providing continuing professional education to design professionals. In an effort to improve continuing education quality standards for the design industry Michael was the first to support the AIA Continuing Education System Award for Excellence. He was also responsible for launching the AIA/CES Firm Symposium which assisted firm leaders in the establishment of industry standards for internal professional development programs that relied heavily on support from product manufactures. According to Michael, “professional development and continuing education is all about constant improvement. The only way to measure the impact of the message you are delivering is to conduct an evaluation at the end of a program. This process is essential not only for the content of your message but also for the quality of the presentation. Without good feedback from the course attendees you will never know if the information is beneficial and if your methodology of delivering the information is leaving the audience at the altar.”

David deBear, CTC, CSI, is the National Construction Service Manager and works for Custom Building Products a product manufacturer and a long time registered continuing education provider. Under David’s leadership Custom Building Products was a multi – time winner of the AIA/CES Award for Excellence. When I recently asked David to reflect back on contributing factors to winning the award he share this story with me related to what he called a more technical related course. David stated that he received one evaluation where the participant thought the topic was relevant but that the course was confusing. David indicated that the course had been receiving mixed reviews and not consistently delivering the intended message. This one evaluation was more critical and more specific. In summary the participant stated that they could not follow the story the topic was covering and that it was confusing. With the specifics provided by this particular participant as well as comparing statements from previous evaluations, David realized that the company needed to bring in a curriculum specialist to restructure the story line. The curriculum specialist reorganized the content and to follow the story line so that it was not confusing. The curriculum specialist added a summary of key points so regardless of the knowledge level of the participant, information was received. David said that after the adjustment, participant satisfaction with the course increased dramatically.
A Product manufacturer that offers continuing education in any industry needs to build a system that continually evaluates all of their courses. Catch the evaluations immediately on-site, do not rely on the internet for feedback for on-site courses. Focus on items such as content, instructor delivery and methodology. Use the information you collect to continually improve your program and courses and to build upon your reputation as a product manufacturer that offers reliable quality education.

Evaluation and Improvement – The firm’s 7th key to quality continuing professional education

The question that I like to raise, "what does your firm do with the information collected after having employees evaluate each course upon completion?" Does your firm require course evaluations from each participant before certificates or credit is awarded? Does your firm use a competency based learning approach that ties into performance and bonus pay? Does your firm use a systematic approach to annual or semi-annual review of the overall education program? Does your firm integrate the results of the evaluations into the firm’s business plans? In order to establish a quality education professional education program you should have answered either “yes,” or answered, “We are working on all of these questions.”

It is amazing that firms spent time and effort to provide some type of an evaluation form for their employees and clients at the end of a training session and then do not use the results for improvement of the either the courses, instructors, staff performance, or business improvement. The opportunities for improvement within the firm are great. The collected information can be used to improve future course offerings, content, instructors, and delivery methods. Forward thinking firms can use the results to improve their firm’s product or services. They can also improve their firm’s marketing and promotion by having clients participate in select sessions.

Your firm could build a system that continually evaluates all of the courses and the employees upon completion of the courses. Curriculum could be developed from the results of the evaluations. Faculty or instructors could be developed from a selection process involving high performing employees. Performance improvement could be measured, evaluated and adjusted according to the business needs of the firm. Internal instructors, staff and human resources/training department staff could receive instantaneous feedback on what needs to improve, and maybe even how to improve. Use the information you collect to continually improve your continuing professional education courses and your business. Who knows, it might even help in the firm’s recruitment efforts when emerging professionals discover that the firm is serious about professional development.

Evaluation and Improvement – An association’s 7th key to quality continuing education

Does your association have participants evaluate each of courses upon completion? Does your association provide evaluations because it is expected? Does your association require course evaluations from each participant before certificates or credit is awarded? Does your association have a systematic approach to annual or semi-annual review of the overall education program? In order to establish a quality education program you should have answered either yes, or working on it to all of these questions. And, if your answer is yes to any of these questions, what do you do with all of that information once it is collected?

I am amazed at how many associations go through all the time and effort to provide some type of evaluation form for participants at the end of the session then do little to even collect the results. At a minimum, the collected information should be used to improve the course content, format, instruction, delivery, and promotion. It should not be used just to determine if participants liked the food, liked the instructor, and that the temperature of the room was OK.

Your association should build a system that continually evaluates all of the courses upon completion. At a minimum you should share all of the information in a detailed summary with your education advisory committee, your faculty, and your staff. Use the information you collect to continually improve your program and courses and to build upon your reputation as an association that offers reliable quality education.

Placement By Design

"PLACEMENT BY DESIGN, Inc. is an A/E/C Design Industry-focused career placement and consulting services firm, specializing in the placement of technical and non-technical A/E/C industry professionals. Our mission is to join design firms and design professionals together - resulting in quality placement services for satisfied employers and employees.

SERVICES:

The 6th Key for a Firm: Implementation and delivery of professional education

For most firms the big question is how committed is the firm toward promoting continuing education for their employees? Assuming that the leadership of the firm is committed to the professional growth of their employees then assessment of employees and firm needs, analysis of the data, and setting measurable objectives are the basics to insuring that implementation of the best process will succeed.

There is no shortage of eager education providers and consultants available, firms should have little difficulty matching education to needs. Many firms that have successful internal professional education programs start by forming and education committee that handles the administration functions of need assessment, selection, implementation, delivery format and other administrative type functions. Generally a staff member is volunteered to handle the facilitation of these duties. As a rule of thumb, if the firm has more than 50 employees the position could be half time with pay or shift of billable hour responsibility. When the firm reaches 100 employees it is time to consider committing to a full time staff person to coordinate the responsibilities of education.

What use to be predominantly a choice between sending staff somewhere externally for training or allowing vendors and consultants to come into the firm has radically changed these last 5-10 years. The use of the internet changed everything and has opened up many new possibilities for adding new delivery formats of education to the firm’s staff. Surprisingly, a hot issue now is what policies are needed to “control” the use of the internet by employees. While cost is the excuse often given for not using new technologies, control of employee’s use of time is more often the concern. Some firms have embraced the new technology and invest in expensive LMS tools. However, there are many solutions available today that are inexpensive that firms could use for implementation and delivery of planned employee education. Other firms withdraw from the technology tools completely and block access to social media tools such as Facebook and limit delivery format types like flash. The education committee needs to match the firm’s strategic plan, with employee needs, and delivery formats. There are so many options available that a blended approach should be seriously considered. Internal technology policies should be realistic and open to considering what are the firm’s education needs. You can either educate your staff or spend time recruiting and training replacements. Identify a qualified staff member and provide the direction and support necessary to maximize on the opportunities. There are now four generations in the workplace. They don’t all learn the same way. Be flexible!

The 6th Key for Associations: Implementation and delivery of continuing education

One advantage of working for an association or non-profit, they have access to their membership data base that stakeholder organizations and marketers often only dream about. While it may be tempting to react with education offerings because a committee or board member has a friend who knows somebody, or they have an interest in a specific topic, please try not to act too quickly. Use your database to do an education need assessment of your members and their clients before saying yes to the committee or board member. Analysis the results of the assessment then develop a plan and design the course. Or just maybe, after analysis of the data you might just say no to the committee or board member. At least the decision or justification will be based upon actual data and not just a reaction.

Once a decision is reached and a plan is drawn up, follow your action plan of implementation and delivery. Association leaders need think in terms of a process that may take 2- 3 years before expecting to see major results. Action plans should include measureable steps throughout the process. Expectations however need to be realistic so be patient and give your plan time to develop and unfold.

At the program level successful associations generally have partners in their education initiative. Keep your lines of communication straightforward and open with your partners. Share information with your partners about what the competition is doing, or about new technology delivery methods. Stay abreast of advocacy or legal issues that may impact your program implementation or delivery directly or indirectly.

There are now four generations in the workplace. Is your association shrinking because new members are not joining? Or growing as the emerging professionals begin to outnumber your long term core members? Add to the mix, diversity in our social structure. Is your association the same core membership that you have experienced for generations? Or are you witnessing a change in membership make-up who hold new points of view? And every association is dealing with a rapid change while members are struggling to accommodate advances in technology. With all of these changes, expectations encourage you to try new and different approaches to delivery. Be flexible in your program implementation. Be flexible in your conference and course delivery methods. But don’t forget to measure progress and adjustments against your plan.

The Fifth Key for the Product Manufacturer to Offer Successful Education Courses: Marketing and Promotion

You will find that most successful product manufacturers have some form of internal professional development for their own staff. For this article I want to focus on the product manufacturers who provide education courses to their clients as part of a strategic marketing approach. Within the design, medical and financial fields the marketing department of a product manufacturer will arrange to offer education courses in a firm’s office, at the professional association local chapter office, and occasionally in a local hotel.

Those businesses that rely on their brand reputation alone will likely fail in their education efforts. When it comes to education, adequate promotion and advertisement is essential. Marketing and promotion of education programs has changed dramatically in just the past 2 - 3 years. Mark Johnson FAIA, CKD, AIBD was a primary force behind two winners of the AIA/CES Award for Education Excellence in the product manufacturer category. Mark led the team at CertainTeed, when they first won the award twice in the late 1990’s. Mark then lead the Whirlpool Corporation architecture education program in 2009 when they won the same award. Mark indicated that with CertainTeed they originally did all the traditional types of promotion of their education courses, trade shows, printed materials, and direct mail. At Whirlpool Mark began to alter his promotion approach by cutting back some of the traditional methods, in large part due to the economy. As a replacement he added online advertisements and online sponsorship. Today Mark has gone high tech, with emphasis on social media. For Mark there are now fewer trade shows, fewer printed brochures, and fewer online advertisements. Several times a day Mark tweets online to build brand awareness with the design community and consumers. Mark lists as the big three social sites for the design industry, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Mark states that social media is like an overlay on top of all of the traditional promotional methods What once took weeks or months to plan and execute now takes hours and minutes, and he can reach both a broader audience and a highly targeted audience. Through Twitter he can promote thought leadership, industry events, and products, real time throughout the day.

To bring marketing and promotion into the present I would point you to the blog of an interactive marketing and online media expert, Elizabeth Grenier. As the Strategic Accounts Manager at Percipio, Media Elizabeth writes that there are 3 eCommerce Phrases You Should Know Using Social Media. she lists E-auction: A tool used in industrial business-to-business procurement; Web 2.0: A second generation of web-based communities such as social-networking sites, wikis, blogs, and folksonomies, which aim to facilitate creativity, collaboration, and sharing among users; and Virtual communities/Community of Practice: A group of people that primarily interact via communication media such as letters, telephone, email or Usenet rather than face to face.

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