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Catalog of Available Courses and Workshops

Below are the titles of seven online courses and/or workshops that are available from Lowther7, LLC Catalog descriptions, learning objectives, and details for each are provided separately following this listing.

Creating Successful Talent Within Your Firm

Available online or by appointment.

Embracing Sustainability in the Workplace

Online only - Instructor-led.

Simple LMS for Firms and Associations

Available online or by appointment.

Cyber Security for Small Businesses

Available online or by appointment.

Overview of Managing Projects

Available online or by appointment.

Developing Online Courses

By appointment only - Instructor-led.

Introduction to Digital & Social Media Marketing

By appointment only - Instructor-led.

Contact us about your workshop questions today; we're happy to help!

Developing Online Courses

Description

This workshop covers the nuts and bolts of getting your first online course developed and deployed, including:

  • components and costs
  • evaluating staffing requirements
  • structure and design
  • course conversion (from live format)
  • options for audio and video production
  • testing and assessment online
  • platforms and server options
  • getting feedback
  • mastering revision cycles
  • licensing and profit projections

You'll leave this live workshop with a complete development plan and timeline for at least one of the courses you'd like to put online. Our experts will walk you through the entire process, helping you make decisions while supplying you with data and how it applies to your situation. Learn about a breadth of approaches and case studies from others in the workshop as they build their course development plans alongside you.

Knowledge Level

This is an awareness level workshop. We encourage instructors at the practitioner and mastery level with little or no online experience to participate.

Workshop Design

This is an instructor led course designed to be delivered either on-site or via web video conference in 4 or 8 hour time frames.

Learning Objectives

At the end of this workshop you will be able to:

1. Describe the various operational and material components of an online course.

2. Determine which online system features would be incompatible together and which would be appropriate for a given course.

3. Research and evaluate various platforms for online presentation and course management and determine a good fit for your project.

4. Create a course outline action plan specific to your organization, including estimated budgets.

This Workshop is Recommended:

• Customized and available online for small teams.
• For Regional or State association events.
• To support a design firm'€™s internal administrative and instructor training.
• To support a product or service manufacturer'€™s administrative and instructor training.

Faculty

Katin Imes
Minimum of 8 participants required to book this session.

Watch for our annual offering of this workshop on the west coast. Contact us about your workshop questions today; we're happy to help!

Is the CEU losing relevancy in the “Age of the Internet?”

Lowther7 Photo - August 2011 Conference Session

For more than half a century the Continuing Education Unit, or as it is more commonly known the CEU has been the standard bearer of measurement for continuing education and professional development. This time based measurement has become such a common term that it is now frequently misrepresented, regardless of some good intentions. So to respect the intent, according to Wikipedia the CEU is a measurement used in continuing education programs, particularly those required in a licensed profession in order for the professional to maintain the license. Examples of professionals in need of annual or bi-annual CEUs; architects, educators, engineers, interior designers, nurses, mental health professionals, physicians, and social workers. Wikipedia goes on to state that the “CEU records are widely used to provide evidence of completion of continuing education requirements mandated by certification bodies, professional societies, or governmental licensing boards.” Licensing boards and certification boards feel some comfort knowing that someone was watching to ensure that the professional/participant/student was in the classroom while the qualified instructor was delivering his/her presentation. Even our laws are written measuring the professionals success in time spent at the event.

The CEU as a standard for measuring continuing education is based upon time, or to be more precise - seat time in class. This means that someone measures the length of the class, the time from start to finish. For decades this system of measurement has worked. But was during the mid 1900’s that the International Association for Continuing Education & Training (IACET) worked with universities and the Department of Defense to promote this industrial age standard of measurement. Around the turn of this century the “Age of the Internet” came in like a storm. Suddenly the web began to warp, change, and reshape time. The CEU has not yet adjusted to keep up with the changes.

Consider of all the changes in technology over just the past five years. We now need to include blended learning, YouTube, iPod, the iPad, the iPhone and a host of mobile devices when we consider an education delivery system. Look at the differences in access speeds of the various platforms, the hardware and software. The hardware and software affected the “time” people spend accessing and participating on, online and mobile courses. People are challenging the importance of time on the web – instead – replacing that with results. Related to continuing education, concerns for competency based learning have returned to the forefront. To tie this together, the CEU is a time based measurement, not necessarily a competency based system. So I ask - has the CEU lost its relevance in the age of the Internet?

Is a Virtual Tour Knowledge or Education?

Photo by Igloo Studios

Recently I was involved with a team that produced a virtual tour. The primary goal of the free virtual tour was intended to give a international audience a chance to gain knowledge by exploring the space. The depth of knowledge gained directly correlated to the participants involvement of freely selecting from varies features such as embedded videos, audio podcasts and information on building materials and products used throughout the space.
Assuming that knowledge becomes education at the point where the participant actually applies that what they learned, there is at one point in the tour a Google sketch-up feature embedded in the program that can actually be used. But what if, as most do, the participant looks at the feature but does not act. Would the knowledge still be education?
The tour can take between 1 – 1.5 hours depending on how many interactive features the participant selects. A final feature includes a quiz based upon the basic elements of the tour. The quiz follows the guidelines outlined in the standards of the International Learning Unit. It meets the organization’s credential requirement, other professional organizations education requirements, and even most state licensing board’s MCE requirements. Only by paying and successfully completing the quiz will “education” credits be awarded? Is that really the only difference between knowledge and education – fees? You be the judge - take the virtual tour, yourself. Stop before the quiz. Is it knowledge or education?

Is a video knowledge or education?

Photo on Flickr by NASA on The Commons

Defining clear terms is a problem here as there is so much gray as we try to distinguish the difference between knowledge and education. An example: a couple of years ago I watched a webinar lecture from Harvard's free online course lectures series about "Historical Preservation in Havana, Cuba." Many universities now offer this type of service. For me this was self-directed knowledge. I gained some useful knowledge that I could apply in a practical way had I chosen. Could this same knowledge also be considered education. Harvard would not likely acknowledge my watching their free lecture as education unless I paid them tuition. If I paid Harvard tuition, would the same lecture immediately transform from knowledge into education?

Some say education is a process or systematic distribution of knowledge. In this case I could claim that I did receive an education and that I can now apply this knowledge.