Sustainability

Catalog of Available Courses and Workshops

Below are the titles of seven online courses and/or workshops that are available from Lowther7, LLC Catalog descriptions, learning objectives, and details for each are provided separately following this listing.

Creating Successful Talent Within Your Firm

Available online or by appointment.

Embracing Sustainability in the Workplace

Online only - Instructor-led.

Cyber Security for Small Businesses

Available online or by appointment.

Developing Online Courses

By appointment only - Instructor-led.

Contact us about your workshop questions today; we're happy to help!

Embracing Sustainability in the Workplace

Sunset Beach, San Diego - Photo permission of Tiffany Elbogen

Description:

It’s a smart business practice and the right thing to do. Find out how to implement sustainability solutions for your workplace. Gain practical information for yourself and your employees to begin on Monday morning. Brand your organization in the world of environmental stewardship. Your instructors will detail and deliver practical approaches and applications toward implementing sustainability with guidance in planning procedures.

Take back practical tips on operating your indoor environments to consider air, water, lighting, fitness, nutrition, mind and comfort. For anyone pursuing a career in a company or in government where there is an effort to build awareness and to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of environmental stewardship and overall social responsibility.

Agenda: One Unit introduced each week.
Unit 1: The Business Case for Sustainability
-Concepts of Triple Bottom Line: People, Planet, and Profit.
-The Return on Investment ( ROI )
-Human Capital Indicators and Employee Engagement
-Transparency for Stakeholders
-Reducing Energy Use Saves on the Bottom Line

Unit 2: An Internal Sustainability Plan
-Initial Assessment of Current Business Model
-An Office Task Force is Essential
-Designing a Mission Statement
-Basics on Environmental Accounting and Reporting
-Monitoring and Evaluation

Unit 3: Wellness in the Workplace
-New Value Proposition for Well Offices
-Wellness Concepts: Air, water, light, fitness, nutrition, comfort and mind
-Risk vs Reward of Wellness Features
-Sick Building Syndrome

Unit 4: Inner Company Initiatives That Work
-Office Procedural Strategies
-A Strategy for Resource Management
-Assessing Current Supply Chain and Purchasing Procedures
-Tools to Track Sustainable Products and Verify Healthy Purchasing
-Suggestions For Greening Your Office

Knowledge Level:

This course is intended as a introduction to sustainability practices in the work environment.

Program Design:

This instructor-led course is delivered on-line 24/7. Approximately 16 hours over a 4 weeks. Highly interactive with individual activities, group discussions and faculty feedback. Brand your organization in the world of environmental stewardship. Your instructors will detail and deliver practical approaches and applications toward implementing sustainability with guidance in planning procedures.

Learning Outcomes Related to The Business Case for Sustainability:

At the completion of this course you will:
1. Know how to engage staff and co-workers to concentrate on efficient environmental practices and to develop internal planning and policy procedures.
2. Have the ability to implement sustainable business procedures and policies with practical applications.
3. Know how to measure and monitor the effectiveness of company office sustainability procedures.
4. Be able to identify the benefits of implementing healthier building renovations, establish energy saving policies, develop greener purchasing, water and waste procedures and initiate green fleet initiatives.
5. Know how to apply practical approaches and resource conservation measures that affect corporate culture.

Next available course:

• Monday, November 5 until Saturday, November 30, 2018.

• To register - go to YouGotClass/

Faculty

Kelly S. Gearhart

LEED Fellow, LEED AP BD+C, LEED AP O+M, a Principal with Triple Green Building Group, a green building consulting firm with locations in the San Francisco Bay area, Savannah, Georgia and Sophia, Bulgaria. Gearhart is a USGBC LEED Faculty member, Instructor for the University of California, former Manager of Commercial Green Building Services at Southface Energy Institute, Inc. and has been involved with green building education, technical assistance, and leadership since 2005. Accredited in the new Building Design + Construction and Existing Buildings: Operations + Maintenance programs, she has taught over 50 full-day and multi-day LEED courses, facilitated seven full-day and multi-day green building charrettes, presented at 12 conferences, consulted with more than 100 clients on green building strategies and worked on 25 LEED registered and certified projects across the U.S. and internationally.

Kerry Mitchell

Has authored over 150 hours of content on sustainability planning metrics. She teaches employees, affiliates and stakeholders about how the metrics of sustainability will provide measurable results.

Contact us about your session questions today; we're happy to help!

Decades of Change for the A/E Practice: Is professional development leading or reacting?

Trends graph markers

Everyone realizes that professional practices have changed drastically and in unimaginable ways during the past two decades. So my questions are: has professional continuing development (CPD) kept up? Have the education providers, design associations, and firms acted as leaders or followers in their efforts to shaping education in the design industry?

When I attended my first American Institute of Architects (AIA) convention twenty years ago, I observed that the education session attracting the highest attendance was Presentation Skills by Joanne Linowes. The remaining top ten sessions were related to "€œhot" practice topics such as project management and leadership. The irony of these topics, presenters submitted their proposals one year ahead of the next convention. Local chapter executives overwhelmingly responded that they selected their monthly meeting topics using a committee, better known as the "who do you know?" approach. Firms basically granted any product manufacturer supplying lunch "€œpitch" time. This was commonly referred to as the €œLunch-N-Learn approach. The better the lunch, to more time allowed.

Ten years later (2005) a lot had changed, in the practice and education. The AIA had implemented their Continuing Education System (CES). The AIA/CES provider program vetted 2700 education providers and began monitoring their courses. Health, Safety and/or Welfare (HSW) became the driving force of professional education. A majority of state licensing boards required 8-12 hours of mandatory continuing education (MCE) all related to HSW. Tracking MCE became critical to maintaining a professional license. Sustainability had become the hot topic everywhere, or at least the title of those€“ dominating the top 10 courses at the AIA convention. Presentation skills, project management, and leadership development courses were still simmering, but other practice related courses became more difficult to find.

By 2005, most A/E firms still relied upon product manufacturer for much of their in-house education, and they were still expected lunch. The big difference at this point, many firms insisted that the product manufacturer and their 1 hour courses be AIA/CES approved. Some of the larger firms had even hired training and organization development specialists with experience from professions outside the A/E industry to head their internal programs. Smaller firms would develop an education specialist from among their own staff. Firms still struggled to obtain presentation skills, project management, and leadership training.

Web based learning was making its influence felt by 2005. According to the American Society of Training and Development (recently renamed Association for Talent Management), by the end of 2010 technology based learning passed traditional classroom training in new courses offered. For the A/E/C Design industry that meant mostly 1 hour or 1.5 hour webinars. Today, technology based learning is making everyone evaluate their approach to sharing knowledge and delivering education. Today you can now find nearly any type of free, short introductory topics on YouTube. More traditional education is offered through programs like the Open University that includes schools like Harvard, MIT and Stanford offering free Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC).

So where are we after 20 years? Today most associations are struggling to find their education niche. Some associations have turned to offering certifications but there are legal education concerns and restrictions but these programs are usually based upon a core curriculum of study. The process for selecting convention and conference presentations continues as before. However, many associations include a virtual component or have expanded their webinar series to complement their conference education programming.

Today, firms are beginning to fill the talent management and organization development positions that were eliminated during the economic downturn. They are returning with a more strategic approach, matching internal education to the firm’s goals and staff skill needs. Some firms are looking at developing their own core curriculum that include development of emerging professionals, practice skills training, project management, client facing skills, advanced presentation skills, and leadership development. Firms are using a blend of knowledge sharing technology tools for the introductory and awareness level skills. For their practitioners, they are using a blend of in-house trainers with vendors and consultants to address gaps that meet their strategic goals. And yes, many still rely upon the product manufacturer with registered AIA courses on, and still expect lunch be provided. Keeping track of all this activity has become strategic and complex.

Is a Virtual Tour Knowledge or Education?

Photo by Igloo Studios

Recently I was involved with a team that produced a virtual tour. The primary goal of the free virtual tour was intended to give a international audience a chance to gain knowledge by exploring the space. The depth of knowledge gained directly correlated to the participants involvement of freely selecting from varies features such as embedded videos, audio podcasts and information on building materials and products used throughout the space.
Assuming that knowledge becomes education at the point where the participant actually applies that what they learned, there is at one point in the tour a Google sketch-up feature embedded in the program that can actually be used. But what if, as most do, the participant looks at the feature but does not act. Would the knowledge still be education?
The tour can take between 1 – 1.5 hours depending on how many interactive features the participant selects. A final feature includes a quiz based upon the basic elements of the tour. The quiz follows the guidelines outlined in the standards of the International Learning Unit. It meets the organization’s credential requirement, other professional organizations education requirements, and even most state licensing board’s MCE requirements. Only by paying and successfully completing the quiz will “education” credits be awarded? Is that really the only difference between knowledge and education – fees? You be the judge - take the virtual tour, yourself. Stop before the quiz. Is it knowledge or education?